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How to Cite Internet Sources in Papers and References

Properly citing sources in one's academic paper can be a real headache. I have been experiencing this myself with the papers I have been writing for my MA Ed and I know exactly what a time consuming this task can be. I have recently bought the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th Edition  and I check it every time I want to make sure my citations comply with the APA regulations and guidelines. I highly recommend this guide for every student and researcher.



Now that many of the sources we use in our papers are found online, you need to know how to properly cite these digital resources. To help you do that, Jennifer wrote an excellent article on how teachers and students can cite internet resources in their academic papers. I am sharing with you some of the basics she mentioned in that article :

                      How to Cite APA Internet Sources in Papers and References

When citing an entire website
There’s usually no complicated rule to follow. Simply state the url address after mentioning the name of the site. For example: “More information on the FAFSA can be found at FAFSA on the Web.”


When citing an article from an online journal
Cite the information in the following order:
Author. (Date of article.) Journal Title, vol. (Issue number), pages cited. Date information retrieved, from (url address).
For example:
Smith, J.R. (2010). “The Psychological Impact of Social Media.” Psychology News, 54(3), 23-24. Retrieved September 7, 2011, from http//www.psychologynews.org/journals/smith.html.


When citing an online newspaper article
Cite the information in the following order:
Author. (Year, Month Day). “Title of Article.” Newspaper Title. Date of informational retrieval, from (url).
For example:
Jackson, L. (2011, March 14). “Studies Show Growing Acceptance of Online Degrees in More Traditional Fields.” The Daily Examiner. Retrieved July 8, 2011 from www.dailyexaminer.com/march14issue.


When citing an email
It’s generally frowned upon to cite a personal or professional email in your reference list, although it can be done in the text of your paper as follows:
Name of sender (personal communication, date).
For example:
E. Rodriguez (personal communication, December 10, 2011).


When citing a tweet
The publisher’s name, as written (not last to first). (Year, month day.) Text of post, in its entirety, including urls if provided [Twitter post]. Retrieved from url.
Mimi James. (2010, March 10). The new study on violent behavior in Chicago inmates was published this morning [Twitter post]. Retrieved from http://www.twitter.com/mimijames323431322.

For how to cite MLA internet sources , check this article and scroll down to find the MLA section.

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