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Teach Your Students about Halloween with This Halloween Book

We are just a week away from Halloween. Well I do not have Halloween in my culture but curiosity drives me to investigate more about the origins of this event and its cultural symbolism.On my quest to learn about Halloween I stumbled upon this infographic and thought you might be interested in having a look as well.





Let me just quote you a brief excerpt from Wikipedia :


`` Though the origin of the word Halloween is Christian, the holiday is commonly thought to have pagan roots.[11] Historian Nicholas Rogers, exploring the origins of Halloween, notes that while "some folklorists have detected its origins in the Roman feast of Pomona, the goddess of fruits and seeds, or in the festival of the dead called Parentalia, it is more typically linked to the Celtic festival of Samhain", which comes from the Old Irish for "summer's end".[11] Samhain (pronounced sah-win or sow-in) was the first and most important of the four quarter days in the medieval Gaelic (IrishScottish and Manx)[12] calendar.[13][14] It was held on or about 31 October–1 November and kindred festivals were held at the same time of year in other Celtic lands; for example the Brythonic Calan Gaeaf (in Wales), Kalan Gwav (in Cornwall) and Kalan GoaƱv (in Brittany). Samhain is mentioned in some of the earliest Irish literature and many important events in Irish mythology happen or begin on Samhain. It marked the end of the harvest season and the beginning of winter or the 'darker half' of the year.] This was a time for stock-taking and preparing for the cold winter ahead; cattle were brought back down from the summer pastures and livestock were slaughtered.[15] In much of the Gaelic world, bonfires were lit and there were rituals involving them.[15] Some of these rituals hint that they may once have involved human sacrifice. Divination games or rituals were also done at Samhain......... ``




The Book of Halloween
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